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New Research Shows Facebook Losing Popularity Among American Teens

04 June 2018

Just 51% of USA individuals aged 13 to 17 say they use Facebook - a dramatic plunge from the 71% who said they used the social network in Pew's previous study in 2015, when it was the dominant online platform.

By comparison, during Pew's 2014-2015 survey, only 24% of teens said there were online nearly constantly.

Lower-income teens were more likely to use Facebook than those from wealthier households, with about 70 percent of those living in a household making less than $30,000 a year reporting using Facebook. YouTube was not included in the 2014-2015 survey.

"It's still by far the dominant social media platform", Sterling noted, "and Snapchat, which is one of the sites pulling teen users from Facebook, has always been dominated by younger users".

"The news has to be concerning to Facebook, although some of the exodus is for Instagram, which is also owned by the company", said Greg Sterling, vice president of strategy and insights at the Local Search Association. Instagram earned only 15-percent of "most used" responses. Meanwhile, Twitter (TWTR) followed at 32%, and Tumblr's popularity (14%) remained the same since the 2015 survey.

Facebook to remove 'trending' news stories section following years of controversy
Facebook says it only rolled Trends out in five countries, and it only accounted for about 1.5% of clicks for news sites. The company is also funding news videos, created exclusively for Facebook by outside publishers it would not yet name.

For NZ teens you need NZ online data, and if you are going to use articles to base some of your parental or even advertising decisions on, its best you use the data that is relevant for your region. Ninety-five percent of teens own a smartphone or have access to one, and 45% say they are online "on a near-constant basis".

Teens online usage has been a subject of many critics who question whether all this access to smartphones and social media are healthy for teens.

The survey also found there is no clear consensus among teenagers about the effect that social media has on the lives of young people today. Another 44% say they go online several times a day, meaning roughly nine-in-ten teens go online at least multiple times per day. Pew didnt speculate on a reason for the drop, though historically, teens often shun services once they become mainstream and used by their parents.

With respect to the impact of social networks in the lives of teens, the opinions are divided: 31% of them judge the whole, positive and 24% negative overall. One of the platforms that are missing from the most recent survey is Vine.

The social media landscape in which teens reside looks markedly different than it did as recently as three years ago. The margin of error is 5 percentage points.

New Research Shows Facebook Losing Popularity Among American Teens